Tuesday, September 7, 2010

Full Body MRI Scan|Whole body MRI Scan

FULL BODY MRI SCAN
Full body MRI is a complicated process but it can be done by expert with caring some tips.When Lauterbur and Damadian described the application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a clinical imaging tool in the early 1970s the popular belief was that the technique would become the ultimate screening tool for the whole body.1 2  However, similar to other modalities limited by cost, acquisition times, availability, and artefact produced by motion, it evolved as a technique to image stationary body parts. Supported by technical developments in the past decade, improved excitatory pulse sequences, and faster methods of localising derived signal, and by increasing awareness of the hazards of radiation imposed by traditional techniques, the ability to use MRI as a rapid imaging tool for the whole body has now been revisited.3–11  Reduced acquisition times have been mirrored by a logical reduction in acquisition costs, and the recent development of the moving MRI table top has facilitated the clinical introduction of this technique as a practical diagnostic tool.


Oncological applications
The principal application of whole body MRI is in detecting skeletal metastases as an alternative to skeletal scintigraphy.3–6 In contrast to scintigraphy, where localisation of tumour deposits is indirect and requires tumour induced activity in osteoblasts, the abundance of protons in the matrix of the tumour allows direct visualisation at MRI. Regional MRI has been shown to be more sensitive than skeletal scintigraphy in the detection of skeletal metastases. More recent studies comparing whole body MRI with scintigraphy have reproduced these results, and again MRI has been found to be at least as effective as scintigraphy (fig 1 and fig 2).3–5 Whole body MRI tends to better detect lesions in the spine and pelvis. In one study authors evaluating the use of whole body MRI as an alternative to bone scan reported finding metastases in 57 of 175 sites in 25 patients compared with 43 of 175 sites in the same 25 patients at scintigraphy (P < 0.001).4 In a more recent study whole body MRI showed 53 of 60 metastases identified at bone scintigraphy. Although lesions in the ribs and skull were missed at magnetic resonance imaging, additional bone metastases were identified when whole body MRI was used in the spine, pelvis, and femur.

n addition to improving detection of skeletal metastases, whole body MRI may allow simultaneous evaluation of soft tissue organs and in so doing facilitate an overview of total tumour burden in an affected patient. In effect, rather than multimodality staging integrating skeletal scintigraphy with computed tomography of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis at the expense of radiation dose, a single whole body MRI scan may facilitate assessment of total tumour burden, particularly in patients whose tumours spread preferentially to brain, bone, and liver, such as breast and lung tumours. In this setting, tumour staging is done without exposing the patient to radiation. In a preliminary study of 17 patients with breast carcinoma, whole body MRI allowed detection of skeletal metastases in 11, liver metastases in five, and intracranial metastases in three patients. Interestingly, contrast enhanced computed tomography identified liver metastases in only three of the 17 patients.7

Of the patients who present with skeletal metastatic disease 15% have no known primary tumour.8 In these patients, despite an extensive search integrating serological tests, endoscopy, and imaging, a primary tumour is likely to be found in only one in five patients at a mean cost of $16 000 (£7000; €12 000).8 As an alternative, total morphological assessment of the body, as afforded by whole body MRI, may allow the detection of a primary tumour as often as the other described, costly approaches. In a preliminary study using whole body MRI in this role, primary tumours were identified in the thyroid, prostate, and lung in patients presenting with skeletal metastases predominantly in the spine.8 Similar preliminary studies have proposed a role for positron emission tomography scanning in the same group of patients, to help localise the primary tumour.  

Non-oncological applications
A worldwide fall in autopsies has prompted a search for a minimally invasive alternative. Attempting to provide an acceptable alternative, whole body MRI has been shown to be effective in the gross assessment of the corpse, helping to identify sites suitable for percutaneous biopsy, particularly in immunocompromised hosts.9 Whole body MRI has been similarly successful in whole body fat measurements and body composition research, and more recently as a primary diagnostic tool in patients with polymyositis.10 11 The advent of molecular imaging, fusing the specificity of molecular technology with the spatial resolution of imaging, is likely to herald many new scanning applications for whole body sequences.
















59 comments:

  1. MRI scans ‘detect early schizophrenia’
    By inkblot

    MRI scans ‘detect early schizophrenia’

    MRI scans used to pick up brain tumours could detect early schizophrenia in young adults, suggests a new study.

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  2. I think the MRI result should be interpreted with the early suspected behavioral changes of the person. also, family history of schizophrenia should be cosidered.

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  3. MRI Scans Can See Our Precious Memories

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  4. A recent study has made a big leap down the road to the digitization of memory. Scientists at University College London have used MRI scans to accurately predict what test subjects were recalling. During the experiment

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  5. why MRI and similar scans are not always effective for finding the actual cause of pain and are the reason that many unnecessary and unsuccessful surgeries are carried out every year in our hospitals. I think you will find this information very interesting, or disturbing depending on which way you look at it!

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  6. Magnetic resonance imaging gives an amazing view inside the human body.

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  7. Has your doctor ordered an MRI? You may be wondering why that particular test, over some other scan, like an x-ray or a CAT scan.

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  8. The MRI scanner can take different pictures depending on what your doctor is looking for. MRI systems can even take pictures of blood flowing through the body! If your doctor needs detailed pictures of soft tissue like muscles, nerves, and even your brain, an MRI is the way to go.

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  9. So why might your doctor suggest an MRI?

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  10. An MRI scan can even diagnose a stroke in its earliest stages! My grandmother's doctors have asked her to get an MRI to investigate memory issues and possible nerve damage in her neck.

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  11. An MRI has many advantages over other tests:

    * No ionizing radiation is used in the testing

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  12. An MRI may seem like an intimidating test. But your doctor has asked for the scan for a reason. Look into an open MRI (rather than a traditional closed MRI) if claustrophobia is holding you back. Call your local imaging center and ask if they give tours; seeing things up close and in person may

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  13. I’ve just come back to work from an MRI scan and I can report that it was a thoroughly unpleasant experience

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  14. MRI denotes magnetic resonance imaging and it is a medical test carried out by physicians to assist in diagnosing and treating medical conditions

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  15. MRI is used to produce detailed images of soft tissues, bones and many other internal body organs.

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  16. MRI scanners provide high quality images that enable physicians to evaluate different body parts much better and then determine the existence of illnesses that might not be adequately assessed using other imaging techniques like computed tomography, ultrasound or x-ray

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  17. Hi Anil, Actually, MRI is the current most precise imaging test in routine clinical practice, especially when taking brain images.

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  18. hi meenu

    MRI scanners offer a non-invasive method of imaging without any exposure to radiation.

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  19. In certain cases MRI scanners are also used. This is because an X-ray does not highlight the soft tissues as well as an MRI scanner. The MRI scan is used for assessing complex orthopedic injuries in which tendons or ligaments might also be harmed.

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  20. Can an MRI scan miss lymphoma?

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  21. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an extraordinary tool, but it has important limitations. For example, the spatial resolution of this technique is generally not good enough for breast imaging.

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  22. some amigos have found an interesting way to boost the resolution of an MRI device: they use a lens to focus radio-frequency magnetic fields.

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  23. I read MRIs pretty much every day and that is a lousy picture. I hope it's either the "before" picture or a low-field magnet...something on the order of a refrigerator magnet. The detail on the medial aspect of the knees is poor, and the resolution sucks. It would be adequate for a localizer but not for diagnosis. Even for MRA source images it is a bad image.

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  24. The main problem with MRI is time, to get higher resolution (more pixels) means longer scan times.

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  25. reena a had a mri scan a wk ago, what I want to know is when we go back to see her Dr should he from the results of the mri be able to tell us if its just a cyst or something else like cancer. And what are the chances this is going to turn out to be cancer.

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  26. Yes they can tell a difference between a cyst and a tumor by MRI, but not always. The MRI can pick up certain characteristics of a growth and those features help radiologists determine wether it could be cancer or not.

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  27. Women with a history of biopsy-proven lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) appear to benefit from the addition of MRI to mammography for annual breast cancer screening.

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  28. Annual screening MRI is recommended by the American Cancer Society as an adjunct to mammographic screening for individuals who have sufficient genetic or family history

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  29. CT and MRI scans are used to stage mesothelioma patients, but research shows they are not very accurate at determining how far mesothelioma has spread.

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  30. How to prevent claustrophobia during MRI scan?

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  31. There is now hope that those with non-pacemaker-dependent implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) may be able to use an MRI scan.

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  32. Now, a new study shows that these ICDs may be able to withstand an MRI without disruption of the heart rhythm or rate.

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  33. they're going to need an MRI exam" states the study leader to Heartwire.

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  34. The study still warns ICD users that extra precaution must be taken to monitor the heart during the exam. MRI exams should only be used on patients were the benefits outweigh the potential risks.

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  35. when it doesn't really matter if the doctor chooses to use an MRI scan or an FDG-PET/CT scan because the results are similar enough between them.

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  36. FDG-PET/CT and MRI show similar diagnostic accuracies in differentiating between malignant and benign soft-tissue tumors, but offer different attributes when imaging for bone tumors.

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  37. doctors that are looking at bone tumors are encouraged to make use of the MRI because it has a better predictive results history than the FDG-PET/CT does.

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  38. Does it matter whether doctors use the MRI or FDG-PET/CT for soft-tissue tumors?

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  39. what procedure for Heart MRI Safe For Pediatric Patients

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  40. Infants with congenital heart diseases can safely be monitored using cardiovascular MRI scans according to a new study completed in Germany.

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  41. The study confirmed that the use of the MRI scan to monitor these patients caused no problems or complications for the infants including those related to blood pressure and heart rate.

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  42. The ability to use the MRI scan makes the process of monitoring these patients much safer.

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  43. Will the MRI become a regular monitoring tool used for pediatric patients with congenital heart problems?

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  44. Just a few of the preventive imaging tools that are regularly used on humans but which can be used on horses (and other animals) include CAT scans, MRI scans, digital radiography and ultrasonography.

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  45. New MRI Analysis May Detect Brain Damage Caused by Car Accidents

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  46. Research has shown that it is possible to use the traditional MRI scan to assess this type of brain injury.

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  47. For the patient, the experience is the same as undergoing any other MRI. However, the doctor uses the additional assistance of a specific type of mathetmatical analysis called diffusion tensor tractography.

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  48. MRI Advances Could Speed Up Technology

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  49. The MRI is a terrific imaging tool that is able to provide important diagnostic information to doctors and their patients.

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  50. Lucid Era has always been high on my list for having been innovative in thinking about how to take as much friction as possible out of the SaaS buying cycle. They have a concept called the “Pipeline Health Check“ that is very slick. You give them access to your Salesforce.com CRM system, they process the data through their analytics solution, and 48 hours they’ll tell you meaningful things about what’s going on. Hence I liken it to an MRI scan for your Sales Pipeline.

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  51. a medical test in which images are made of the organs inside your body, or the image that is produced in this way. MRI is a short form of magnetic resonance imaging.

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  52. There is a lot of discussion surrounding CT scans and MRIs, about the differences, advantages of each and about which one to go for.

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  53. MRI uses magnetic field as opposed to X-rays used by CT scan (more risky)

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  54. MRI gives more detail in case of soft tissues.

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  55. MRI can produce images by changing reference planes and without moving the patients

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  56. Fewer documented cases of reactions to MRI, and it is considered to be safer than X-ray dye.

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  57. MRI scan is better for tumor identification and detection

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  58. In clinical practice, MRI is used to distinguish pathologic tissue (such as a brain tumor) from normal tissue

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  59. One advantage of an MRI scan is that it is harmless to the patient. It uses strong magnetic fields and non-ionizing radiation in the radio frequency range, unlike CT scans and traditional X-rays, which both use ionizing radiation.

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